ISSN: 2149-2247 | E-ISSN: 2149-2549

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Point Prevalence Survey of Antimicrobial Prescription and Infection in Pediatric and Neonatal Wards of Two Iranian Teaching Hospitals [Erciyes Med J]
Erciyes Med J. 2019; 41(1): 25-32 | DOI: 10.5152/etd.2018.18191

Point Prevalence Survey of Antimicrobial Prescription and Infection in Pediatric and Neonatal Wards of Two Iranian Teaching Hospitals

Jafar Soltani1, Gholamreza Pouladfar2, Ann Versporten3, Mike Sharland4, Herman Goossens3, Zahra Jafarpour2, Naseh Soleimani1
1Department of Pediatrics, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences Faculty of Medicine, Sanandaj, Iran
2Professor Alborzi Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Nemazee Teaching Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
3Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, Vaccine & Infectious Disease Institute (VAXINFECTIO), University of Antwerp Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Antwerp, Belgium
4Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, Institute for Infection and Immunity, St. Georges University of London, London, UK

Objective: Point Prevalence Surveys (PPSs) provide useful data on the patterns of in-hospital antimicrobial prescription. Aiming to identify targets for quality improvement, we evaluated prescribing patterns of antimicrobials in the pediatric and neonatal wards of two tertiary referral centers in Iran.
Materials and Methods: Two PPSs on antimicrobial use in children and neonates hospitalized in the Nemazee teaching hospital in Shiraz (south of Iran) and Besat teaching hospital in Sanandaj (west of Iran) were performed for two consecutive years. We used a validated and standardized method based on the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children project.
Results: Out of a total of 266 and 129 admissions in pediatric and neonatal wards, respectively, 61% of pediatric inpatients and 71% of neonates received at least one antimicrobial. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics in pediatric wards were ceftriaxone (29.2%) and vancomycin (15%), and in neonatal wards, ampicillin (34.7%) and cefotaxime (14.7%). Antimicrobial combination therapies and the parenteral route of administration in pediatric wards were 40% and 91.3%, and in neonatal wards, 63% and 100%, respectively. Empirical antibiotic therapies in pediatric and neonatal wards were 93.6% and 96%, respectively.
Conclusion: The high percentage of antimicrobial use, combination therapies, and empirical therapies could be the targets for quality improvement in our hospitals.

Keywords: Prevalence study, antibacterial agents, hospitalized children, antibiotic resistance, Iran

Jafar Soltani, Gholamreza Pouladfar, Ann Versporten, Mike Sharland, Herman Goossens, Zahra Jafarpour, Naseh Soleimani. Point Prevalence Survey of Antimicrobial Prescription and Infection in Pediatric and Neonatal Wards of Two Iranian Teaching Hospitals. Erciyes Med J. 2019; 41(1): 25-32

Corresponding Author: Zahra Jafarpour, Iran
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